Training Tips For Your Medium, Large and Extra-Large Dog

Training medium, large and extra large dogs varies greatly from training a Pomeranian, Pugs, etc. They are in a class all by themselves. They are known as the working dogs. As their title states, dogs in this category have been bred to work alongside humans in various roles. The Terriers work as a four-legged version of rat poison. Spaniels of all sizes have worked to flush out game. Labrador Retrievers were bred to do as their name implies, retrieve what their owners hunted. Australian Shepherds and other sheep dogs were bred to heard sheep and other cattle. German Shepherds and Chow Chows have been our guardians and protectors. These functions have been bred into their form and function and can greatly affect how we train them. All of these dogs have the desire to serve us, but when working on obedience, they require special care. The very things that make them good at their jobs can also be the things that make training more difficult. Difficult, but not impossible, once you understand why your dog acts the way he does and how to make him work with you. It is all a matter of mutual understanding. Being Mindful of Your Breed’s Tendencies Will Assist You as You Train The first thing you need to understand is what your dog was bred for. This will help you understand the way you need to approach teaching him new commands. For example, most dogs in the spaniel family were bred to be bird-dogs, or to flush out game for the hunter. As part of fulfilling this role, spaniels had to follow commands to the letter, or risk losing the hunt. As such, spaniels tend to be good listener and will easily pick up commands when stated clearly and rewarded properly. Other dogs, however, like Huskies, GSDs and some hounds can have a more willful streak to them. This doesn’t make them less obedient, just less willing to concede that your way is the right way. So with these breeds you must leave no doubt that you are the leader and that you command respect. How do you do this? First, if you’re going to issue a command, you must say it like you mean it. This doesn’t mean yell, in fact, if you find yourself yelling to get your point across, stop! All yelling does is create fear and stress in your dog. It means having a firm, but gentle voice. If you say, “sit” be sure and maintain eye contact and keep your posture strong. If you don’t, Schroeder, your German Shepherd, may decide you are too docile to command him. Once he has complied with your request, reward him with praise. Always keep boundaries and expectations clear, however. If you have asked your Husky to do something, don’t give up if he turns away. Get his attention and give the command in a non-harmful way, until he complies. Giving up will only make him think he can’t be told what to do, and it will be even harder to get him to obey next time. As with anything, it is about consistency and patience. You didn’t learn to speak overnight or learn to ride a bike with one lesson. It is important to see your dog as being no different. All dogs are trainable, some might just be more stubborn than others. These dogs are not impossible if you work with them when they are young. The advantage to this is not only their small size, but also their greater willingness to be taught. This is especially important for extra-large breeds like the Newfoundland, Great Dane and the Tibetan Mastiff, who grow to sizes that can easily overpower their masters. Agility, hunting, tracking and other physical activities may also help establish a greater bond between your dog and you; in turn, this may make obedience training easier on both of you. But even with these general tips in mind, it is always a good idea to consult the knowledge and help of a trainer when dealing with these or any other dog. They will help you manage these spirited breeds so that they become a special part of your family, not a major headache. It needn’t mean you must have face-to-face consultations. Many well-known trainers offer their obedience classes on DVD. Are you giving your pet the best pet health care you are able to give? Do you understand the medications and treatments prescribed for your pet? David Jackson, VMD, is now offering a free Ebook by subscribing to My Pet Information Network at http://www.mypetinformationnetwork.com/ . The Ebook is entitled “Making It Work: A Veterinary Guide To Your Pet’s Health”. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ron_Ayalon

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Training Tips For Your Medium, Large and Extra-Large Dog

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