Dog Teeth Cleaning – Methods For Removing Tartar

Cleaning dog’s teeth is important for many reasons. The most obvious reason is to help the dog avoid the dreaded “doggie breath” so many suffer from. Another reason is to prevent the unsightly look of plaque build-up on the teeth. A happy smile with pearl white teeth is what every dog owner wants for their canine. However, there is another reason for cleaning dogs’ teeth which is far more important. Just like in humans, if plaque is allowed to build up on your dog’s teeth, there is a significant chance for infection of the gums. This infection can often lead to bleeding gums. The fact that the gums are bleeding signifies that there is a direct access there in the gums to the blood supply. Therefore, the bacteria associated with the plaque build-up can then have direct entry into the blood stream. The blood can then carry the bacteria to other parts of the body and actually infect various organs. The byproducts given off by the bacteria can be very harmful. Illness and even death in dogs have been attributed to such infections. With respect to cleaning dogs’ teeth, always remember it is far easier to keep the plaque from building up in the first place than it is to remove it once the deposit is heavy. Oftentimes, a vet will consider the plaque such a threat to the dog’s health that he or she will suggest scaling. Cleaning dog teeth in this way requires general anesthetic. Putting a dog under anesthetic can be dangerous. This is especially true in older dogs. Owners should understand that the death rate with adverse reactions to anesthetic is much higher in dogs than in humans. Questions about the risks of the procedure should always be asked before scaling is used to cleaning dog teeth. Again, it is far easier to keep dog teeth free from tartar than it is to remove it once the build up is great. There are products such as dog toothpaste and other cleaners which can be used. In fact, there are even “dog tooth brushes” which can be used with the gel or paste in order to keep the dog’s teeth clean. Although it may be difficult at first to get the dog used to the idea of cleaning his or her teeth, with some work and good dog psychology it is possible to have the dog relaxed and open to the act of brushing. If the plaque is not built up too heavily, brushing a dog’s teeth is only required 3 or 4 times a week. If the build-up on the teeth is heavy, daily or even twice daily brushing for several months may be required. Most of the gels and toothpastes available have a lingering effect which continues to work beyond the actual brushing. The products tend to help dissolve the plaque simply by being in contact with it. Therefore, it is important not to allow the dog to eat or drink anything for an hour or so after the teeth brushing. At night, just before bedtime is an excellent time to clean dogs’ teeth. Cleaning your dog’s teeth is important part of maintaining his or her good health. It’s important not to overlook that aspect of canine hygiene. Steve Weber has more articles about canine health and cleaning dog teeth at his http://www.CactusCanyon.com website. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2779764

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Dog Teeth: Top 7 Natural Tips To Healing Dental Problems Now

Your dog’s teeth, and their care are vital in terms of keeping your dog healthy and preventing disease. Periodontal (gum) disease is the number one diagnosed problem in dogs; by the age of three, 80% of dogs have some form of periodontal disease. Lack of healthy teeth and gums can lead to heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, stroke and even diabetes. In this article I will cover the dog teeth anatomy, the causes of dental disease, and the most important natural solutions to keeping your dogs teeth and gums healthy at home. Dog’s start with deciduous (baby) teeth- similar to people. The teeth first erupt between the third and sixth weeks- at four months the puppies start to lose these baby teeth, and gain the full number of 42 adult teeth by the ages of 6-7 months. Some dogs have baby teeth that don’t fall out ( retained), and these can be extracted in a simple procedure by your veterinarian during the spay or neuter at 6-7 months. Most dental problems happen after the adult teeth have formed. Plaque, a thin coat of bacteria, accumulates on the teeth, then it progresses to tartar, leading to gum inflammation. Bacteria also grows under the gum-line, causing gum infection (gingivitis) which can lead to tooth loss if not treated. Other dental problems include broken teeth, which can show as being painful to chew. Tooth root abscess are infections which form at the tooth root; they can cause swelling under the eye. The signs of dental disease in your dog are similar to people. These include bad breath ( halitosis), reluctance to chew, redness at the gum line and visible tartar on the teeth. In advanced periodontal disease the teeth are loose, and may even fall out. Some dogs may be ill and quite sick if the bacteria from the mouth has spread to other organs, such as the heart or liver. The big question then is what can you do? Fortunately there are many things, and I want to give you my most effective natural remedies. Dental Diet. Ensure that your dog eats a dry kibble with larger pieces that have to be chewed. Some food companies now produce specific dental diets which will lower tartar buildup. They are more abrasive on the teeth and some contain an enzyme which lowers tartar formation. These foods are available at your local veterinarian. Natural Diets. Raw meaty bones and windpipes from cows or pigs can help keep teeth clean. If your dog splinters and swallows large pieces of bone, he is at risk of obstruction, so do not give him bones. Some dogs love chicken necks. To rule out the risk of Salmonella (a bacterial infection), put the bones or windpipes in boiling water for 30 seconds first. Healthy Treats. Raw vegetables, such as carrots are a great, low calorie treat that can help clean the teeth. If your dog likes them, then feed away. Brush. The best way to keep your pet’s teeth clean is by brushing. Ideally this should be done daily, but twice a week is a good goal. Begin by rubbing your finger around your pet’s mouth. Flavor it with tuna to make it enticing for your dog. A finger toothbrush can be used (it fits around the end of your finger). Use pet toothpaste, for if swallowed it will not upset your pet’s stomach. Baking soda is another safe natural toothpaste. The electric toothbrushes are very effective and the long neck helps you get to the back premolars. Vitamin C is used by many alternative practitioners for dental disease. It is an immune stimulant and helps the production of normal gum and teeth tissue. The starting cat dose is 100 mg daily. The starting dog dose is 100 mg per 10 lbs daily. If your pet gets diarrhea, lower the dose. Plaque Off. This is a completely natural product which is suitable for dogs. It is a special type of seaweed which has been found to have specific beneficial effects for oral care. It comes in a granulated form which is easily added to food every day. It is rich in natural iodine and contains important vitamins and minerals and is free from artificial colors, preservatives, gluten and sugar There are two herbs that can help your dog’s teeth. Calendula lotion can be used to heal ulcers in the mouth and promote healing of damaged tissue. Chamomilia can be used to decrease puppy and kitten chewing, alleviating some of the signs of teething pain. Myrrh can be mixed with water and applied topically to the inflamed gum tissue to decrease gum inflammation. Now you should be able to understand the importance of keeping your dog’s teeth healthy, and recognize the signs and symptoms of dental disease in your dog. If you see red gums, visible tartar, bad breath or reluctance to chew, then your dog likely has periodontal disease. There are many things you can be doing to prevent and natural treat your dog’s teeth problems; the most important remedies include, specific diets, brushing, the use of supplements, and certain herbs for gum inflammation. Dr Andrew Jones is the author of a Free Ebook, Dog Health Secrets, which gives you over 100 safe, natural and effective at home remedies to solve your dog’s health problems quickly and easily at home. He reveals what Vaccines to AVOID and what to give, The BEST food to feed, plus HOW to save money on veterinary fees. Your FREE DOG HEALTH SECRETS BOOK is at http://www.theinternetpetvet.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dr_Andrew_Jones,_DVM

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The Importance of Dog Daycare

When you work all day it is hard to know what to do with your dog. You could leave him in a crate or enclosed in a room in your house but is this really fair on the dog. The majority of people work nine till five or longer, therefore your dog is left for at least eight hours on its own. This can cause boredom, isolation, behavioural problems and even depression, not to mention that they can’t hold the toilet for that amount of time. This means you will come home to a lot of mess in your house and also this is extremely uncomfortable for your dog and could cause bladder problems. The best solution for your dog if you are out at work all day is dog daycare, this is a new phenomenon where people are opening up their homes to look after other peoples dogs when they are out at work. The following points prove just how important dog daycare is.    1. Your dog will get to interact with lots of other dogs which is vitally important for pack integration. This is even more important if your dog is a puppy as many of the behavioural problems that we see in dogs occur because they are poorly socialised when they are young.    2. Dogs that integrate just with their owners and no other dogs or people can suffer from anxiety and fear biting. This can also cause separation anxiety and cause the dog to be a nervous wreck when it does eventually for some reason have to be apart from its owners. This is very unfair on the dog as it will be suffering all sorts of negative emotions which are unnatural and wouldn’t be apparent in the wild.    3. Dogs love it! They get to go to dog daycare on a regular basis so they make friends with the other dogs and look forward to going every time. What would you prefer staying at home on your own all day or meeting up with your friends and having fun, it’s the same for your dog!    4. Protect your home – if your dog is at dog daycare having a great time, he won’t be at your home, bored, causing him to chew and destroy the furniture and toileting around your home.    5. At dog daycare your dog will get walked at least once a day where they will play with the other dogs and have a great time.    6. On the dog walks at dog daycare your dog will get basic dog training to work on his recall, use of commands and walking on the lead. If you are in the process of puppy training this will help to reinforce that training on a regular basis. Dog daycare is obviously more expensive than leaving your dog on its own but is worth every penny as you will return home from work to a happy and content dog and not feel stressed and worried that it’s on its own. Also it will teach your dog to be well socialised and fully integrated with other dogs and stop separation anxiety and aggression to other dogs. 4 Paws in the park is a premium dog walking and pet service, based in a family home in East Sheen, London, providing a modern and preferred alternative to kennels.4 Paws in the Park offers a range of pet services to make your life happy and stress free. They include: Dog walking, dog boarding, dog daycare, pet feeding and pet taxi services.4 Paws in the park is owned by Brodie Ellis. Originally from the Cotswolds, i naturally grew up surrounded by animals of all shapes and sizes. I am and have always been a huge animal lover and nothing makes me happier than a content and happy animal. I have two dogs of my own and so i understand that it can be very stressful leaving your pet for long periods of time and finding someone you trust to look after them. For more information please visit: http://www.thedogwalkeruk.com. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5245958

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