Rat Terrier Dog

The breed name comes from the occupation of its earliest ancestors brought to the US by working class British migrants as these quick, tough little dogs gained their fame in rat pit gambling. However they were, for the most part, bred for speed. Their speed is used for controlling vermin and hunting squirrels, hare, and other small game. Like all terriers of this type, Rat Terriers most likely developed from crosses among breeds like the English White Terrier, Manchester Terrier, Smooth Fox Terrier, and Whippet. After the 1890s, as the breed type became popular in America, other breeds were added to the mix. Beagle, Italian Greyhounds, Miniature Pinschers, and Chihuahuas were likely used to add scenting ability, speed, and smaller size. Many of the foundation Rat Terriers were indistinguishable from small mixed-breed hunting dogs known as “feists”. The smaller varieties were split off from the Rat Terrier very early on, registered by the UKC as the Toy Fox Terrier beginning in 1936. Rat Terriers were cherished as loyal and efficient killers of vermin on 20th century American Farms, as well as excellent hunting companions. As a result they were one of the most popular dog types from the 1920s to the 1940s. However the widespread use of chemical pesticides and the growth of commercial farming led to a sharp decline in the breed from the 1950s onwards. Fortunately breed loyalists maintained the bloodline, leading to the modern Rat Terrier we enjoy today. The genetic diversity of the Rat Terrier is undoubtedly its greatest asset, and is responsible for the overall health, keen intelligence, and soundness of the breed. Most modern breeds were developed from a few founding dogs and then propagated from a closed gene pool. In contrast, the Rat Terrier has benefited from a long history of refinement with regular outcrosses to bring in useful qualities and genetic variability. Although often mistaken for a Jack Russell Terrier, the Rat Terrier has a different profile and a very different temperament. Rat Terriers are sleeker in musculature, finer of bone, and have a more refined head. They always have a short single coat, i.e., they are never wire coated. Rat Terriers tend to be less aggressive than Jack Russells; while they have a definite terrier personality they also have an “off switch” and love lounging on the sofa in a lap as much as tearing about the yard. Rat Terriers are normally cheerful dogs, and they tend to be calmer and more sensitive than Jack Russells to changes in their environment, owner’s moods, or to unexpected noises, people, and activities. The “social sensitivity” of Rat Terriers makes them very trainable and easier to live with for the average pet owner, but it also means that extensive socialization from an early age is critical. Proper socialization of a Rat Terrier puppy includes exposing the animal to a wide variety of people and places, particularly during the first three months of life. Like most active and intelligent breeds, Rat Terriers tend to be happier when they receive a great deal of mental stimulation and exercise. Data refer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_Terrier Rat Terrier Dog Club Data American Rat Terrier Association – The official UKC parent breed club. Breed standards, membership application, news, events, and yearly top ten dogs. Central Florida Rat Terrier Society – Online group of breed lovers who chat and meet others in Central Florida and the greater Southeast. Photographs from their events, stories, and care tips. Central Valley Rat Terrier Club – Club background, membership information, events, and photos. California. National Rat Terrier Association – Detailed breed history, standards with picture examples, photographs of various sizes and colors of the breed, breeder links, and registry. Rat Terrier Club of America – Club and breed history, breed standard, membership information, and calendar of events. Volcano View Rat Terrier Club – For enthusiasts in the Pacific Northwest. Membership information, breed standard, information on upcoming events, and links to other relevant resources.

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Animal Law – Can My Dog Be Destroyed If It Bites Someone Once?

It is a common misconception that every dog is allowed “one free bite”. Many people believe that the first time their dog bites someone it will be let off with a warning, and that the dog will not be seized and destroyed unless it goes on to bite someone a second time. The criminal offence – dangerous dogs in public places Criminal offences relating to dogs which bite or attack people are set out in the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991. People often associate this legislation with specific breed s of particularly violent and aggressive dog, such as pit bull terriers, but in fact the majority of the provisions of this Act apply to every dog in England and Wales, regardless of its breed or size. Section 3 of the Act creates the criminal offence of “allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control in a public place” and whilst this may sound like it would only apply in extreme cases, because of the definition which judges have applied to the word dangerous, a dog is considered to be “dangerously out of control” wherever there is reasonable fear that the dog might injure someone. A dog can be considered dangerous even if it has never bit someone and because there is a presumption that wherever a dog does injure someone it is dangerously out of control and should be destroyed. If the owner is found guilty, the court may sentence him to imprisonment although this is extremely rare. In most cases the court will fine the owner and order him to pay compensation to anyone who was injured by the dog. What about incidents where occur on private land? As well as applying to dogs in public places, such as a park or street, the dog biting laws set out by the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 also applies to places which are not public but where the dog is not permitted to be. This means, for example, that if your dog escapes into a neighbour’s garden and bites someone then you could be found guilty of an offence and the dog could be destroyed. Other than the exception outlined above, where a dangerous dog is on private land it is not covered by the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and no criminal offence is committed. However, if someone is injured or threatened by a dog on the dog owner’s private property it may still be possible for them to bring civil proceedings against a dog owner in their local magistrates court under the Dogs Act 1871. If the complainant is able to show that the dog is dangerous and has not been kept properly under control, the court may order its destruction or may order the owner to take additional steps to control the dog. This type of case is different from a case under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in that: • Other than in exceptional circumstances the court will not consider a dog to be dangerous because of a single incident of misbehaviour • There is no presumption that a dog should be destroyed • The court cannot fine or punish the owner of the dog • The court cannot award compensation (although a person who is injured might still be able to make a claim for negligence or breach of occupier’s duty in the County Court) Isn’t it just enough to put up a “Beware of the Dog” sign? Occupiers of property have a duty to warn visitors and trespassers about dangers which are present on the land, and this includes dogs which may bite or attack. Whilst in some circumstances a warning sign might help a landowner to avoid paying out compensation for negligence or breach of occupier’s duty, it is unlikely to be something which the court will take into account when considering the fate of the dog. If a dog is allowed to roam free on your property and will bite anyone who approaches then it is likely that a bench of magistrates will consider it to be dangerous and out of control under the Dogs Act 1871 and will order its destruction regardless of whether you have warned visitors. On Law on the Web you can find free legal advice on all domains of law, even some you didn’t know existed. We can help you access your legal rights through jargon-free pro bono legal information. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Luke_Culverwell

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Dog Owners – Dog Law in the United Kingdom

Laws that date back to the 19th Century are still in existence in the UK and can be use today. Laws seem to have come thick and fast in more recent years. The early laws were mainly concerned with ferocious dogs and muzzling them. More recently the 1971 Animals Act gives farmer the right to shoot a dog that worries livestock – without warning. The 1988 Road Traffic Act include the statement that dogs must be on a lead when near roads. The Guard Dog Act of 1975 says the handler must be able to control the dog and give a verbal warning before releasing his dog to search. In conversation with friends, the only dog law they seemed to know was concerned with the Dangerous Dogs Act of 1991. This is really unfortunate because the Animal Welfare Act of 2007; which covers cruelty to animals, people causing unnecessary suffering to animals, dog fighting, tail docking and the sale of dogs; is far more important, not for any of those but for the rights it gives to dogs. The rights, the 2007 Animal Welfare Act gives to dogs are: 1. The right to a suitable environment in which to live, with other dogs or alone 2. The right to a suitable diet 3. The right to have the opportunity to behave like a dog – run, play and exercise 4. The right to be protected from pain suffering injury and disease. The person responsible for the dog must take “such steps as reasonable in all the circumstances to ensure that the needs of an animal, for which you are responsible are met to the extent required by good practice.” You are responsible for an animal if you are the owner, in charge of it, a parent or guardian of a minor who is in charge of the dog. Obviously I give mention of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 – which applies to every single dog in England & Wales. It is a criminal offence if a dog is “dangerously out of control in a public place”. The obvious question is what is meant by “dangerously out of control” – it means if there are reasonable fears that the dog will injure any person. Police have the power to seize such a dog. If an injury is caused, to a person, then there is a presumption in favour of destruction of the dog. This Act ties in with the 1871 Dogs Act, which is a civil complaint, which applies regardless of where any incident takes place, and proceedings can only be brought against the owner. Thus is possible if a dog shows itself to be dangerous in its general behaviour, not just in a single incident. Less severe punishment can follow from this law, as the the court has no powers to fine or order compensation but does have unfettered discretion on what to do with the dog. For the first time in England & Wales, the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 proscribed certain types of dog: Pit Bull Terrier Japanese Tosa Dogo Argentino Fila Braziliero Other laws to mention are the Environmental Protection Act 1990 which gives local councils control over nuisance, which includes excessive barking. The council would be able to take action following a complaint from a member of the public. Control of Dogs Order, 1992, states a collar must be worn in public showing name and address of owner. Dogs without a collar may be seized by the police. Dog Control Orders (DCO), come from the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act of 2005, and give local councils the power to make orders regarding dogs in their area. There are five offences which may be prescribed in a DCO,which may result in a fine of up to £1000: – failing to remove dog faeces – not keeping a dog on a lead (the length can be specified) – not putting and keeping, a dog on a lead when directed to do so by an authorised officer (the length can be specified) – permitting a dog to enter land from which dogs are excluded – taking more than a specified number of dogs onto land So dog owner in the United Kingdom, have a lot of laws to keep on the right side of or they will have to suffer the consequences of any transgressions. Roy Dickinson of http://www.totrainmydog.com, is a dog trainer of many years as well a writer. He’ll help you find those little tips and tricks to make your dog training easier. You’ll find many of these tips and other information on his website To Train My Dog. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Roy_Dickinson

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