Dog Teeth Cleaning – Methods For Removing Tartar

Cleaning dog’s teeth is important for many reasons. The most obvious reason is to help the dog avoid the dreaded “doggie breath” so many suffer from. Another reason is to prevent the unsightly look of plaque build-up on the teeth. A happy smile with pearl white teeth is what every dog owner wants for their canine. However, there is another reason for cleaning dogs’ teeth which is far more important. Just like in humans, if plaque is allowed to build up on your dog’s teeth, there is a significant chance for infection of the gums. This infection can often lead to bleeding gums. The fact that the gums are bleeding signifies that there is a direct access there in the gums to the blood supply. Therefore, the bacteria associated with the plaque build-up can then have direct entry into the blood stream. The blood can then carry the bacteria to other parts of the body and actually infect various organs. The byproducts given off by the bacteria can be very harmful. Illness and even death in dogs have been attributed to such infections. With respect to cleaning dogs’ teeth, always remember it is far easier to keep the plaque from building up in the first place than it is to remove it once the deposit is heavy. Oftentimes, a vet will consider the plaque such a threat to the dog’s health that he or she will suggest scaling. Cleaning dog teeth in this way requires general anesthetic. Putting a dog under anesthetic can be dangerous. This is especially true in older dogs. Owners should understand that the death rate with adverse reactions to anesthetic is much higher in dogs than in humans. Questions about the risks of the procedure should always be asked before scaling is used to cleaning dog teeth. Again, it is far easier to keep dog teeth free from tartar than it is to remove it once the build up is great. There are products such as dog toothpaste and other cleaners which can be used. In fact, there are even “dog tooth brushes” which can be used with the gel or paste in order to keep the dog’s teeth clean. Although it may be difficult at first to get the dog used to the idea of cleaning his or her teeth, with some work and good dog psychology it is possible to have the dog relaxed and open to the act of brushing. If the plaque is not built up too heavily, brushing a dog’s teeth is only required 3 or 4 times a week. If the build-up on the teeth is heavy, daily or even twice daily brushing for several months may be required. Most of the gels and toothpastes available have a lingering effect which continues to work beyond the actual brushing. The products tend to help dissolve the plaque simply by being in contact with it. Therefore, it is important not to allow the dog to eat or drink anything for an hour or so after the teeth brushing. At night, just before bedtime is an excellent time to clean dogs’ teeth. Cleaning your dog’s teeth is important part of maintaining his or her good health. It’s important not to overlook that aspect of canine hygiene. Steve Weber has more articles about canine health and cleaning dog teeth at his http://www.CactusCanyon.com website. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2779764

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FDIC and NCUA Insurance: Which is Safer?

Whether you have an online bank or use the bank in your town, you share a common thread with almost every account holder in America.  The bottom line is that you want your money to be safe. Obviously safety and insurance are important when it comes to the money in your bank.  That’s why FDIC insurance was created. But what about credit unions, do they have the same protection as banks?  It might surprise you, but credit unions don’t use FDIC.  They use a form of insurance provided by the NCUA. So what’s the difference? Is FDIC safer than NCUA?  Let’s look into both and figure out the similarities and differences between FDIC and NCUA insurance. What does FDIC Cover? First off, FDIC stands for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, an independent government agency that was created under the Glass Steagall Act of 1933.    The purpose of FDIC is to protect account holders in the event that a bank fails. FDIC insurance will cover deposits within an insured bank.  Just about every type of account is covered, including: checking, savings, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit (CDs). You as an account holder are insured up to $250,000 per institution under the FDIC insurance limits .  Actually, FDIC insurance will extend to multiple ownership categories, so you may be able to have more than $250,000 insured at an institution if you qualify under these separate ownership categories. The list of categories from FDIC website include: Single Accounts Certain Retirement Accounts Joint Accounts Revocable Trust Accounts Irrevocable Trust Accounts Employee Benefit Plan Accounts Corporation/Partnership/Unincorporated Association Accounts Government Accounts What FDIC Does Not Protect Just because your bank has FDIC insurance, it doesn’t mean that every account type will be covered.  There are quite a few investment products that are not insured, which include: mutual funds, life insurance products, stocks, bonds, and annuities. What Does NCUA Cover? While credit unions aren’t covered by FDIC, it doesn’t mean they are any less safe.  In fact, the NCUA (National Credit Union Administration) is also an independent federal agency that deals with insuring credit unions.  Backed fully by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, the NCUA provides protection through the NCUSIF (National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund). Account holders at credit unions enjoy the same amount of protection ($250,000) as FDIC protected bank depositors. Established in 1970, the NCUSIF is funded solely by the credit unions and not U.S. tax payers, a characteristic that is shared by both NCUA and FDIC. Like FDIC, the coverage of NCUSIF reaches to insure savings accounts, share draft (checking) accounts, certificates of deposit and money market accounts.  Likewise, securities like mutual funds, stocks, bonds and insurance products are not covered by NCUA. Are All Banks and Credit Unions Insured? The surprising answer is NO .  Not all banks are required to be FDIC insured.  In the same way, not all credit unions decide to be covered by NCUA.  While some institutions may have other forms of private insurance, it’s important to ask your bank or credit union if they are insured by FDIC or NCUA. FDIC vs. NCUA: Which One is the Safest? It’s pretty clear to see that both banks and credit unions have the protection you need to know that your money is insured.  Both FDIC and NCUA are fully backed by the U.S. Government and both provide protection up to $250,000 per account holder per institution.  While a bank failure may be unlikely for the average depositor, it’s important to know that your money is insured. If you trust the U.S. Government to back your dollars, you’ll be okay! Would you ever bank somewhere without FDIC or NCUA insurance?  How important is deposit insurance to you? Related Articles: What is FDIC? How to Choose a Credit Union Those sneaky bank fees What’s a Money Market? Tim is a personal finance writer at Faith and Finance a Christian financial help blog that provides financial insights for individuals, businesses, and churches. Outside of finance, Tim enjoys spending time with his wife, playing the saxophone, reading economics books, and a good game of RISK or Catan. Find him on Twitter and Facebook .

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